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Himalayan Consensus


Member of the United Nations Theme Group on Poverty and Inequality.

Our mission is to protect and endorse ethnic diversity and indigenous identity as well as prioritizing environmental protection and community development.

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Himalayan Consensus


Member of the United Nations Theme Group on Poverty and Inequality.

Our mission is to protect and endorse ethnic diversity and indigenous identity as well as prioritizing environmental protection and community development.

The Himalayan Consensus Institute is a non-profit organization, advocating for a fresh economic development paradigm drawn from collective experiences across the Himalayan region. 

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Consensus Summit 2015


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Consensus Summit 2015


Himalayan Consensus Summit will convene multi-stakeholders from a spectrum of community, business, finance, civil society and government in Kathmandhu, Nepal, September 2015. The Summit will develop a consensus of vision and action between these stakeholders toward addressing issues of climate change that effects all nations sharing the fragile bio-diversity zone of the Himalayas. 

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Projects


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Projects


Consensus Projects are social enterprises that have implemented sustainable development ideas. Every project promotes ethnic diversity and cultural preservation in some manner while protecting the environment in its pursuit of a sustainable means of living for its community.

 
 
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Himalaya-Third Pole Circle


 

A defining motivation for the Himalaya-Third pole Circle is to introduce to the region the remarkably constructive and positive experience of the way in which collaboration evolved in the Arctic

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Himalaya-Third Pole Circle


 

A defining motivation for the Himalaya-Third pole Circle is to introduce to the region the remarkably constructive and positive experience of the way in which collaboration evolved in the Arctic

Initiating and sustaining dialogue and collaboration on the challenges of climate change was at the heart of the second Himalaya-Third Pole Circle meeting held in Thimphu, Bhutan, on 5 and 6 February 2015.

Her Royal Highness Princess Dechen Yangzom Wangchuck, Her Royal Highness Princess Kezang Choden Wangchuck, Prime Minister Lyonchnen Tshering Tobgay of Bhutan, and President Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson of Iceland graced the inauguration of the two-day meeting.

Delivering his keynote address, Lyonchhen Tshering Tobgay said people in the mountains face various challenges of increasing population, poverty, and climate change. Other challenges included deforestation, pollution, desertification, and habitat loss. “We have to work together because ‘thinking globally, acting locally’ isn’t enough. We have to think globally and act regionally,” he said.

President Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson said his commitment to the Himalaya-Third Pole process is inspired by the belief that coming together can help in learning from each other. He said there is mounting evidence of how the retreating glaciers will impact the rivers and water systems in the Himalayan countries directing attention to dramatic consequences for food and energy production, security and international relations
— www.icimod.org

Picture below is with David Molden, Executive Director of ICIMOD who is leading the science research on glacial melting and the President of Iceland.

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Consensus News


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Consensus News


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Glacial Watch


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Glacial Watch


Turbulent blizzards, Everest avalanches, and devastating flooding in Kashmir have brought the Himalayas into the global media spotlight. Glacial melt due to rising temperatures caused by increased carbon trajectories will cause avalanches at high altitudes, flooding downstream, and desertification when the water runs out.


Often called the “third pole” because there is more snow and ice there than anywhere else in the world outside the polar regions, the Himalayas run through Afghanistan, China, and six other countries, all which share tense borders populated by multi-ethnic peoples. This region has possibly the highest concentration of diverse culture and religion on the planet. If the glaciers melt and water runs out, it would be a formula for disaster.


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